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Future of Work - Blogs

WHAT JOBS WILL ORGANIZATIONS VALUE MOST?

WHAT JOBS WILL BE VALUED?

Will the permanent employee soon be a relic of the past? How will jobs change in the future, and how will we define the "workforce"?

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THE HUMAN EDGE

THE HUMAN EDGE

While digital technology is enabling both disruption and incredible opportunity, we must remember that its role is only to facilitate and enable solutions. It cannot create them.

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HIGH VALUE ASSETS -
THEY'RE NOT WHAT YOU THINK

HIGH VALUE ASSETS

People, and their potential to create economic and intangible capital, remain a firm's highest-valued asset. So who are the pivotal people who create disproportionate value for their organizations?

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OPTIMAL FUTURE WILL SEEK NEW ROLES FOR DISPLACED

NEW ROLES FOR DISPLACED

This is the paradox of the future of work. Technology can either enable or disable the global workforce. How do we move forward, and how will it impact firms?

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VALUING THE CREATORS

VALUING THE CREATORS

How are people the driving force for technology? When an innovation strikes gold, the connection between the value that's created and the team behind the tech is often lost.

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THE TECH-PEOPLE PARTNERSHIP

THE TECH-PEOPLE PARTNERSHIP

People are central to the future of work, but only when partnering with technology. What should this people-tech partnership look like, and what will make it work?

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WHY THE FUTURE OF WORK IS HUMAN

FUTURE OF WORK

We're living in a digital revolution as significant as the Industrial Age. Computers already surpass the human brain at sheer processing, and the true era of AI lies just beyond the horizon. So where do humans fit in?

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Valuing the creators

Blog post by Jean-Marc Laouchez

[Originally published on LinkedIn: Join the conversation. Full reprint below]
 
Although technology is positioned to reshape the future of work, without a critical component—acceptance and adoption by people—it can never fully achieve its promise. How are people the driving force for technology, and why are skills, which only people can bring, essential to creating the future of work? 


Do you recognize the names Ahti Heinla, Priit Kasesalu and Jaan Tallinn? Tony Fadell? Tim Berners-Lee? What about Skype, iTunes, the iPhone, the World Wide Web?
 

When an exciting new technology arrives, it’s often forgotten that a big breakthrough starts as a big idea, the brainchild of a person or team.
 

"Firms should view high-performing, high-potential people—those capable of creating great value for them—as high-value assets. That’s because, in the future, these innovators and achievers—not real estate, machinery, or inventory—will drive growth"

Like any product, technology creates value and gains market share by solving real people’s problems. When an innovation strikes gold, the connection between the value that’s created and the team behind the technology is often lost. But without these exceptional individuals, the value could not be realized.


Firms should view high-performing, high-potential people—those capable of creating great value for them—as high-value assets. That’s because, in the future, these innovators and achievers—not real estate, machinery, or inventory—will drive growth. Consider that the economic value Berners-Lee, Fadell, Heinla, Kasesalu and Tallinn have released amounts to trillions of dollars.
 

After Berners-Lee conceived hypertext mark-up language, he famously refused to put a price tag on the first Web page. Although he noted in his 1989 proposal that the United States military and librarians worldwide would find value in the World Wide Web, he could not have predicted the commercial impact of his advance. In 2015, the US online retail market alone was worth an estimated $342.9 billion and is expected to reach nearly $700 billion by 2020. Google, today almost a synonym for the Internet, enjoys a brand worth estimated at $82.5 billion. With the number of online transactions projected to pass eight trillion globally by 2020, plus revenues from advertising, and the nascent Internet of Things (which by itself is projected to inject $200 billion into the UK economy alone by 2020), the true commercial value of Berners-Lee’s innovation is still unfolding.


"When an innovation strikes gold, the connection between the value that’s created and the team behind the technology is often lost. But without these exceptional individuals, the value could not be realized" 

The coders who created Skype, the Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) software that gained a million users within its first month, are almost national heroes in their native Estonia. VoIP technology had been on the market for 10 years when programmers Ahti Heinla, Priit Kasesalu and Jaan Tallinn pioneered their key innovation as Skype, bypassing a central server or telecommunication providers’ lines to connect people via their PCs and home lines. Originally designed for the consumer market, it’s now firmly part of the business landscape. Microsoft bought the company for $8.5 billion in 2011, replacing its native Lync product with Skype for Business in April 2015.

 

Many see Steve Jobs as the mastermind behind iTunes. It was the brainchild of entrepreneur Tony Fadell, who saw the opportunity to connect an MP3 player with a digital music store. Apple hired him and gave him a team of 30, and the iPod’s release in 2001 helped to disrupt the music industry. In the first three quarters of 2016, Apple made $18.03 billion from iTunes sales alone, and although the iPod has quietly slipped into the tech dust bins of history, its creation was a key milestone in developing the iPhone, which hit 231.2 million unit sales worldwide in 2015. Presumably Apple is glad it made such a smart hire.
 

Apple’s experiences with Fadell prove the rule: Although technology clearly releases great value for people, whether it enhances people’s lives or enlarges shareholder’s dividends, it cannot (yet) create itself. Now and for the foreseeable future, innovations require people to conceive them, create them, and drive them to productive use. So companies seeking success should focus on their talent by looking within the organization or bringing smart people in. It’s how they will find their unique—human—catalysts for growth.
 

-Jean-Marc Laouchez, Solutions Managing Director, Korn Ferry 
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High value assets – they're not what you think

Blog post by Stu Crandell

[Originally published on LinkedIn: Join the conversation. Full reprint below]
 
Technology is positioned to reshape the future of work. But without a critical component—acceptance and adoption by people—it can never achieve its full impact.  Who are the pivotal people who create disproportionate value for their firms? 


There’s a new war on for talent, and it’s driven by digitization. Scared of being left behind, or eager to disrupt, firms pursuing digital strategies are scouring the landscape for onetime leaders at Google and Facebook, hoping these shining lights can replicate their successes in different environments. Companies hope to find talent that can deliver outsized value to their organizations and customers in this new environment.  

 

It’s a smart move; companies seeking to create superior performance need to focus on their people. As new and unimagined innovations hit the market in the future, firms will recognize that the people who can embrace change, see around the corners, and outmaneuver the competition are critical to success. The sharing economy, as exemplified by high-value giants like Airbnb and WeWork, continues to grow, and because it prizes access over ownership, we expect to see such traditional assets as real estate decline in worth. Instead people, and their potential to create economic and intangible capital, will become a firm’s highest-value assets.
 

"The pivotal roles and people in them differ not only industry by industry but also company by company. That’s why connecting people to the firm’s future strategy is critical"


But some people will contribute more than others. For example, a Korn Ferry client has set up research and development “innovation centers” around the world. Although they are small, they create a disproportionately high impact. Another client pursuing a digital strategy is experimenting with online business models to develop new revenue streams. Although they deliver modest returns now, these models are seen as key to growth. The people running these R&D centers and creating online business models are responsible for driving their firms’ future success.


Who are the people driving growth for your organization, where are they, and where should they be deployed? Firms should beware of a one-size-fits-all approach. The pivotal roles and people in them differ not only industry by industry but also company by company. That’s why connecting people to the firm’s future strategy is critical. Before planning roles, organizations must be clear about the skills and capabilities needed to create success in their chosen models. If external partners deliver an integral part of the value chain, the business needs strong collaborative skills. If everything is being done in-house, perhaps driving process execution is the number one desired capability.


"The sharing economy continues to grow, and because it prizes access over ownership, we expect to see such traditional assets as real estate decline in worth. Instead people, and their potential to create economic and intangible capital, will become a firm’s highest-value assets"

The World’s Most Admired Companies (WMACs) are already proactively developing their people in line with future needs. In Korn Ferry Hay Group’s 2016 research with Fortune, three-quarters of WMACs stated that identifying the capabilities they would need 10 years from now and determining the composition of their future workforce were top priorities. Finding and enabling the people who will create superior performance is how WMACs intend to succeed in the future.  

 

To connect people to a firm’s future strategy, leaders must examine the business and ask some tough questions. Where in the organization will the most value be created, given the new strategies in these changing environments? What are the roles that will be critical in making this happen (bearing in mind they may not be the traditional ones or even formal ones)? What unique people capabilities will be required in these roles? Who already has the right skill set?  Who can be developed, and to what extent? What should be done with those who cannot move with the times? And how can leaders keep those remaining engaged so the organization doesn’t lose its heritage?

 

-Stu Crandell, Senior Vice President, Korn Ferry Institute & Global Solutions 
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From August-September, Korn Ferry interviewed 800 business leaders in large global organisations about how they intend to navigate the future of work. Sign-up to receive the results and our other research findings in November.

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Optimal future will seek new roles for displaced

Blog post by Signe Spencer

[Originally published on LinkedIn: Join the conversation. Full reprint below]
 
Although technology may reshape the future of work, without a central component–acceptance and adoption by people—it can never fully achieve its promise. Korn Ferry believes that people are critical to the future of work and that only a partnership between them and technology will release greater value for organizations. But some people will be left behind. How can they still contribute and benefit? 


Technology and automation are constantly accelerating and boosting productivity. Freed from more mundane tasks, people can be more efficient and innovative, ultimately creating greater value for their organizations. The future looks bright.


But there is a dark side to the future of work. Many people could be shut out of it. As more work is automated and fewer clerical and manual positions remain, people in these roles will be jobless unless they can adapt and learn something a machine can’t learn.


This is the paradox of the future of work. Technology can either enable or disable the global workforce. It will allow some people to work smarter so they can do more for their organizations; it will disempower others and take their jobs. 
 

"But there is a dark side to the future of work. Many people could be shut out of it. As more work is automated and fewer clerical and manual positions remain, people in these roles will be jobless unless they can adapt and learn something a machine can’t learn."
 

Why is this relevant for companies, usually intent on following lean principles? Because the people being pushed out of future work still influence the wider business environment:

  • They are customers. Part of Henry Ford’s genius was to build a car for the middle class and to pay his workers enough to join it. Without disposable income, people don’t buy discretionary items. This could lead to shrinking economies and even another global recession. 
  • They are voters. They can influence and even reshape the business environment, nationally and globally, through political channels. For evidence, just look at the recent rise of nationalist political voices in the US and Europe.  

Although the “gig economy” may look like the answer to some of the challenges, it isn’t creating enough middle-level jobs to replace positions being painted out by automation. People reliant on gig economy work will struggle to make living wages or create the stability required to raise families. How will a reduced customer base, scraping by and dissatisfied with their quality of life, affect organizations’ bottom line?


A vision for the future


So what is the answer? There is no simple, single solution: Creating a future that works for everyone will be accomplished only by many small steps that add up. There are implications for business and corporate leaders in supporting social change and government policies. Some areas to consider:

 

  • There will still be work for people involving cognitive, creative, problem-solving skills; in fact, these are the skills businesses will need. But, universally, the basic education system isn’t keeping up with the increasing requirements of employability. Changes to education are needed to bolster the capacities employers will rely on in the future: creative thinking, problem-solving, adaptability, flexibility, the ability to collaborate in diverse teams, and learning agility.
  • Education can’t stop there. Adults, too, must have access to constant educational opportunities to acquire new, specific knowledge and skills, often related to technology and its applications. This learning may occur inside companies. But the burden shouldn’t rest solely on employers’ shoulders: Much of it needs to be available to the unserved and underserved employees so they can refresh and re-equip themselves to meet organizations’ new needs.
  • Solid, reliable infrastructure is critical to a future digital economy, and machines have only a limited ability to create it. Investments in infrastructure will both employ people who might otherwise be left behind and enable technology advances. In the UK alone, construction firms have urged the government to invest in skills to meet anticipated demand over the next 30 years.


-Signe Spencer, Client Research Partner, Korn Ferry Institute
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The tech-people partnership

Blog post by Anthony Colella

[Originally published on LinkedIn: Join the conversation. Full reprint below]
 
Although technology is positioned to reshape the future of work, without a critical component–acceptance and adoption by people – it can never achieve its full impact. Korn Ferry believes that people are central to the future of work, and only a partnership between them and technology will release greater value for organizations. In this blog, we explore what the people-tech partnership should look like, and what will make it work. 

No company advances technology for the sake of innovating. Whether it improves the customer experience – increasing choice, offering better pricing – or helps increase employee performance – marketing automation, Amazon’s warehouse robots –  technology’s purpose is to create value for people or to solve a human problem. People are ultimately the reason for every innovation.

 

"In the future, we will expect a hyper-personalized experience from companies. We will expect technology to be even more predictive, and to deliver relevant information to us 'just in time'” 

But as people get more they expect more. The challenge for business is to keep pace with ever-increasing customer expectations. Established companies often hesitate to invest in new, unproven technology, while start-ups with a “fail fast, fail better” attitude deploy it in unconventional ways to disrupt the status quo. Yet businesses that harness technology’s power stand to win big. The trick is to partner technology effectively with their value proposition to customers and their core competencies – usually embodied in the knowledge and talents of their people. Then the technology works for, not against them ─ whether it boosts performance, releases greater value, or creates more customer choice. 

Three key trends: personal, predictive, just in time

In the future, we will expect a hyper-personalized experience from companies. We will expect technology to be even more “predictive”, and to deliver relevant information to us “just in time.” This trend is only accelerating.

Consider the healthcare firm that augments its physicians’ expertise with technology like IBM’s Watson. Advances in medical science are published every day: to keep up physicians would need to spend 160 hours reading per week, clearly impossible. But if a patient presents an unusual case and the doctor wants to confirm her diagnosis, Watson can analyze and combine symptoms, patient data, and family history with relevant articles and all current findings with speed and precision that no human can. Ultimately the machine delivers a list of potential diagnoses along with a confidence score for each hypothesis – based on all the relevant data available. This increases the chances of an immediate, accurate diagnosis, and the physician’s own time is maximized as they do the ‘human’ part of the job (using their expertise and judgement to hypothesize) while the computer mines data (to support or disprove the hypothesis and enable accurate treatment to commence faster). Partnering with technology helps more patients and increases each physician’s productivity.

Imagine translating such capabilities and benefits to your own business and customers. The “just in time” delivery of relevant, sifted content that enables more accurate, faster decision-making will help organizations increase agility and productivity.

"By sharing information in the Cloud, machine learning can be replicated at scale. But none of this can occur without people and their cooperation, without the data and consent that people constantly create” 

But to serve us better, technology needs human help. Machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) are sophisticated algorithms that “learn” by analyzing data about people and their actions; essentially, people train the algorithms through usage. Facebook’s newsfeed function is a good example: it analyzes human behavior on the platform to refine the algorithm.  To take it up a level, networked devices can “learn” from each other by sharing information in the Cloud, meaning machine learning can be replicated at scale. But none of this can occur without people and their cooperation, without the data and content that people constantly create.

So, strange as it sounds, people and technology need each other. It is only through their partnership and collaboration that the full potential of both can be realized. The challenge for business leaders is to identify the right technology to serve their customers best, then to connect it with their people.

 

-Anthony Colella, Vice President, Commercial Product Development, Korn Ferry
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Why the future of work is human

Blog post by Tania Lennon

[Originally published on LinkedIn: Join the conversation. Full reprint below]
 
We’re living in the digital revolution, as significant for humanity as the discovery of electricity or the Industrial Age. Computers already surpass the human brain at sheer processing capability. Artificial intelligence is developing intuition. Robots and drones are becoming as common as cars – which will soon all drive themselves. 

Yet a key aspect is missing from the picture. People, and their contributions to business, are being painted out. But we shouldn’t be so quick to erase them.

It’s true that technology is positioned to reshape the future. But it’s people who will either accelerate or limit its impact. People are inventors, champions – and customers. There is no value to be created from technology unless people embrace it. 

The concept of value itself is shifting. The emergence of the sharing economy, with its flagship examples of Airbnb and WeWork, heralds a new era of access, not ownership. Tangible assets like power plants and machinery may decline in worth. In contrast, intellectual property, innovation, and old-fashioned human creativity will forge value for customers and firms, fuelling growth. Some analysts already insist that talent should become a financial metric, explicitly linking the value people bring with the performance they create.  


"People are inventors, champions – and customers. There is no value to be created from technology unless people embrace it."


And people do create value, simply, because to work is human. People work for organizations that reflect their personal values and that allow them to release their innate, human potential. Companies see the benefit in personal heroics and discretionary effort; effort a machine will never make. 

This isn’t a debate about man against machine. The purpose of advancing technology – always – is to boost the performance of and well-being of people. The greatest value to societies, organizations, and individuals will be realized when people partner with technology to release their and its full potential. 

But this poses huge challenges. Leaders must ask: What technology is right for my organization, and how will my people partner with it? Who will create the greatest value, how can I identify them, and how can I enable their best performance? What jobs do I need to release this value for my firm and shareholders? And what happens to the people left behind? This last question is important, from a business as well as moral perspective. Will they affect your business through political channels?  


"This isn’t a debate about man against machine. The purpose of advancing technology – always – is to boost the performance and well-being of human beings." 


Korn Ferry’s clients are already asking these questions, and it’s the firm’s mission to answer them. Over the next seven weeks we’ll share insight from experts, helping companies prepare for, and to even outperform in the future of work.

The digital revolution won’t render people obsolete and the algorithm all-powerful. But it is a paradigm shift. And organizations that engage with the hard questions now, embrace the new reality, and enable their people will see superior performance and release greater value. 

-Tania Lennon, Senior Client Partner, Korn Ferry Hay Group, London 
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The human edge

Blog post by Rick Lash

[Originally published on LinkedIn: Join the conversation. Full reprint below]
 
Technology is positioned to reshape the future of work. But without critical components—acceptance and adoption by people—it can never achieve its full impact. Why, when digital technology is so powerful, should organizations still prize the contributions of their people?  


While digital technology is enabling disruption—think Uber, Airbnb or Amazon—it’s also facilitating an era of incredible opportunity. But we must remember that technology’s role is only to facilitate and enable solutions. It cannot create them. The solutions to the biggest issues facing business and society today will come from human minds, because they have capacities unlike anything else on earth, natural or technological. This is the human edge.
 

Only people can conceptualize abstract ideas, intuit connections, conceive of things that don’t exist yet, and turn ideas into reality. Connecting, harnessing and releasing the potential of many human brains to collectively solve problems has driven innovation since the Stone Age. Now digital technology can enable us to connect billions of minds, helping people collectively solve many of the world’s most intractable problems.
 

"But as any leader knows, bringing people together and showing them a problem is only half the battle. Without the competencies of emotional intelligence, it doesn’t matter how many great minds work on a project."

Consider how laboratory scientists are crowdsourcing potential cures for AIDS and cancer from communities of online gamers. The FoldIt initiative challenges and connects gamers to model how proteins behave in real viruses and bodies through online puzzles. In 2011, using insights from their gamer community, researchers mapped the structure of a critical enzyme that helps the AIDS virus reproduce, identifying target areas for drug treatment in the process. Previously, scientists had spent a decade trying unsuccessfully to decode its structure. 
 

But as any leader knows, bringing people together and showing them a problem is only half the battle. Without the competencies of emotional intelligence—including cooperation, empathy, the ability to influence, conflict management, and emotional self-awareness—it doesn’t matter how many great minds work on a project. This is especially pertinent today, as organizations are flatter and work is done by multi-skilled teams of people from diverse backgrounds, cultures, and geographies. People must possess the abilities to share power and accept feedback, and they must be curious enough to understand what motivates others. 
 

Fortunately, we have everything we need to enable such advanced collaboration. Archaeological evidence suggests that the human brain increased in size to undertake its biggest challenge—understanding other people and predicting how they may react in any given situation. Although artificial intelligence may be the closest tool to the analytical, computational human brain ever created, it’s only as powerful as the imaginations that use it and is years away from developing full emotional intelligence. The human edge doesn’t just drive new ideas; it also underpins the cooperation required to realize them.


"Connecting, harnessing and releasing the potential of many human brains to collectively solve problems has driven innovation since the Stone Age. Now digital technology can enable us to connect billions of minds, helping people collectively solve many of the world’s most intractable problems.

So how can organizations use the human edge to their advantage? What can leaders do to bring people together and successfully facilitate innovation? They must:
 

  • Create one shared purpose. Aligning the organization around a sense of shared purpose creates a common goal bigger than functional silos, quarterly results, or geographic differences. And as people increasingly are choosing to join firms that provide meaningful work, companies that lead with a shared sense of purpose attract top talent. 
  • Shift their mindset. Today’s leaders must act more as facilitators than as managers. Connecting people enables them to solve complex problems together.
  • Rethink collaboration. Technology is a tool. Don’t invest in a system unless it is clear how it will foster greater connection. Take the time to understand what technology you should partner your people with, given your unique value proposition to customers. 


Thinking for the future, imagining new possibilities, collaborating, cooperating, and managing conflict are uniquely human skills, critical to driving innovation and solving problems. Today, given the complexity of the problems that societies and businesses face, the human edge is needed more than ever.
 

-Rick Lash, Senior Client Partner at Korn Ferry Hay Group 
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From August-September 2016, Korn Ferry interviewed 800 business leaders in large global organisations about how they intend to navigate the future of work. Sign-up to receive the results and our other research findings in November.

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In the future, what jobs will organizations value most?

Blog post by Karin Visser

[Originally published on LinkedIn: Join the conversation. Full reprint below]
 
Technology is positioned to reshape the future of work. But without a critical component—acceptance and adoption by people—it can never achieve its full impact. How will jobs change in the future? What jobs will organizations value most? How will the workforce change?

 

Will the permanent employee soon be a relic of the past?

 

Today, freelancers add valuable skills and support on the fringes. But in the future, the “contingent workforce” will be a significant part of organizations: In the United States alone, the number of temporary workers is predicted to hit 6 million in 2020. Some organizations already employ significant numbers of “outside circle” colleagues as part of their strategy. Uber is an extreme example, as “outside circle” labor enables its business model, but more traditional firms are following the trend: ExxonMobil’s UK business consisted of 1,300 contractors and 3,000 employees in 2015.
  
So who will be left in the organization? Firms will rely on smaller core teams playing bigger roles at higher levels. The nature of these jobs will change: They will be more fluid than stable, with an even greater emphasis on collaboration and managing complexity. And as relationships between jobs become increasingly complicated, job descriptions will become “person” descriptions, influenced more by the talent of the person who fills the role than by traditional business requirements.  

 

"As jobs grow bigger, they will demand greater cognitive capabilities, because people not only will need greater knowledge and expertise; they must also be able to apply that know-how in unfamiliar situations"


Bringing an outsized helping of talent to each role is critical. As jobs grow bigger, they will demand greater cognitive capabilities, because people not only will need greater knowledge and expertise; they must also be able to apply that know-how in unfamiliar situations. This may require greater levels of education, development for employees, or even the creation of new jobs.     

So what jobs will these highly skilled, highly intelligent people do to create more value for their organizations? We see new roles in the “inner circle” created at two levels, one reporting to the board and the other reporting to the C-suite. 


Reporting to board level, we expect to see these leaders: 

  • Chief data officer (CDO): responsible for enterprise-wide governance and deployment of information as a core business asset.
  • Chief information security officer (CISO): responsible for security of personnel, physical assets, and information in both digital and physical form.
  • Chief experience officer (CXO): responsible for the overall experience and impact of an organization’s products and services.
     

Reporting into the C-suite, we expect to see this talent: 

  • Data scientist: responsible, as a strategic rather than support role, for mining data and building models for business forecasting.
  • Digital security master: responsible for ensuring digital security of all organization assets, including information, physical assets and personnel. 
  • Experience marketer: responsible for the overall experience of an organization’s products and services. 


Future ready: link roles, strategy
 

What can firms do now to move faster to more fluid, more capable workforces, capable of performing to higher standards in an uncertain future? They must:

  • Understand which roles can be outsourced and which should remain or be created internally.
  • Grasp the capabilities that the contingent workforce must bring to deliver on the strategy. Evaluate the size and scope of these roles. 
  • Evaluate the size of the roles needed within the organization and identify the capabilities people will need to fulfil them. Look for knowledge, problem-solving aptitude, and strong collaboration skills to get the best from the entire workforce.
     

-Karin Visser, Director, Korn Ferry Institute and Associate Client Partner, Korn Ferry Hay Group 
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From August-September, Korn Ferry interviewed 800 business leaders in large global organisations about how they intend to navigate the future of work. Sign-up to receive the results and our other research findings in November.

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